Sex

Teens share their taste in porn

The latest academic scoop? Teenage boys and girls are way more into porn than we realised…

Teens share their taste in porn

Sit through any movie where the plot revolves around teenage boys, house parties and the pursuit of lost virginity and/or the illegal acquisition of alcohol and you’ll inevitably come across one thing. Porn.

But unlike what the stereotype so strongly suggests, it’s not just testosterone-charged boys who’ve got sex on the brain. A new study from Uppsala University in Sweden has found that both genders are equally as interested in sex on film.

Magdalena Mattebo, a researcher from the university’s Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, gave questionnaires asking about their sexual experiences and pornography consumption to over 800 16-year-old students.

While the proportion of teenage boys who watched and fantasised about the sex they’ve seen in porn was higher (shocker), the types of sex each gender fantasises about were evenly balanced.

“It was unexpected that more than every tenth girl in the consumption group stated that they watch pornography less than they would like to,” says Mattebo.

“It was also unexpected that there was no difference between girls and boys regarding fantasies about sexual acts, and that an equal proportion of girls and boys said that pornography influences their sexual behaviour.”

Interestingly (and this might just be a trend among Swedish students), girls were more experienced when it comes to different types of sex, whereas there was no difference between the genders on types of sexual partners – like one night stands or group sex.

One disappointing result from the study concluded that teens still think it’s more acceptable for boys to have a bunch of different sexual partners than it is for girls - and so the “he’s a player” versus “she’s promiscuous” labelling continues…

“An interesting finding was that among the most sexually experienced adolescents, there was a perception that girls and boys are equally interested in sex, which is a positive finding from the perspective of gender equality,” Mattebo says.

Sexologist and relationship expert Dr. Nikki Goldstein told Cosmo about the dangers of teens watching too much porn, "It can be great, and sometimes the only way for them to see what sex is but teens aren't aware that this [porn] isn't "real sex". Their brains are not developed enough to understand consequences and they don't have the maturity to see these movies for what they are."

She argues that the best solution is to offer education that shows a more realistic sexual experience. "Thanks to technology, we can't stop teens from engaging in porn, but instead of continually focusing on how to stop these images reaching teens, we need to be counteracting the negative effects with positive messages on real sex and adequate sex education."