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This 24 y.o Japanese adult film star cashes in on looking like a child and it's kinda disturbing

Kohey Nishi has carved out a lucrative career making erotic videos that portray him to be a child.

Standing at just 109cm-tall Kohey Nishi may not look like the oiled up brut we're used to seeing in porn but the adult actor has carved out a lucrative career for himself making erotic videos that seemingly portray him to be a child as young as five.

Now there's nothing wrong with him having sex - he's 24 and has natural urges - but what is frightening is the fetish appeal of the films he produces; porn where he is obviously dressed like a child.

In a recent interview with VICE Nishi - who suffers from mucopolysaccharidosis, a progressive incurable disease - revealed he accidently got into the adult film business after becoming "drinking buddies" with porn director Kei Morikaka.

Since getting into the industry the actor has starred in multiple videos - one of his favourites being Having Sex in the Magic Mirror Box Car with a Female College Student with F-Cup Breasts Who Wants to Be a Kindergarten Teacher - and he's all too aware of his niche lure of appearing like a minor having sex.

"There is no one who is an adult who looks more like a kid than me," Nishi told VICE about his on screen characters. "You cannot cast actual kids sometimes, so I'd like to fill that gap in the market."

But while he says he might be attracting the eyeballs of sexual predators, the actor says he believes the work he does is actually protecting kids.

Nishi explains: "I was once told that 'Your videos seem dangerous as you look a real kid on screen.' But I have considered that my works prevent children from being sexually abused, just like war movies and shooter video games can contribute to peace."

Um... we don't know about that.

While what Nishi is making might be disturbing - some would say it helps paedophiles conjure up alarming imaginings of children - what he's doing is not illegal in Japan.

Despite having a worrying number of virgins (a 2016 study found 40 per cent of Japan's millennial are sexless, Japan has a very interesting relationship with child pornography.

Until 2014 Japan was the only member of the G7 group of industrialised countries that had not banned possession of child porn. According to the laws then, you could not make or distribute child porn, but you could possess it. After the laws came in in 2014, anyone with child porn had one year to get rid of their stash.

However, today, paedophilic images in manga comic books remain legal and advocates for this say that banning the creation of such images would be a violation of their freedom of speech.

When the 2014 ban came into play the Japan Magazine Publishers' Association, which reps more than 90 publishing companies, released a statement in June of that year claiming that the regulation could "put a strain" on artists' freedom of expression and publishing culture.

Nishi's films are not illegal, and they don't look like they'll become illegal anytime soon in the country that allows the production and sale of creepily-realistic child sex dolls..

But his claim that he's helping protect kids from abuse by helping people to express their desires legally might not stack up.

Michael Seto, a psychologist and sexologist at the University of Toronto, was responding to questions about child sex dolls when he told the [The Atlantic] there were two different types of paedophiles.

He said: "For some paedophiles, access to artificial child pornography or to child sex dolls could be a safer outlet for their sexual urges, reducing the likelihood that they would seek out child pornography or sex with real children.

"For others, having these substitutes might only aggravate their sense of frustration."

But again, Nishi's films are not illegal and he told VICE that for now he's quite comfortable with the "slander" that comes with the work he does.

"I have no problem with my career," he told VICE.

Adding that his online popularity buoys any negativity he gets - and anyone who doesn't like what he does seldom says it to his face.

"I think that I'm popular among the youth from their late teens to mid-20s. And I also have a large number of female fans," the actor said.

"Sometimes I receive emails saying bad things about me, but I have never had scary encounters since I am rarely approached by my fans on the street."